Oil Comparision

Rice Bran Shortening is a premium multipurpose cooking oil that has been produced from specially selected rice and carefully refined to maintain the inherent natural anti-oxidants of gamma oryzanol, phytosterols and vitamin E.

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends the average intake of fat should be 30% of your total caloric intake.  This fat intake should consist of balanced fat, which provides nutrients that are essential to sustain life.  A balanced fat intake should contain approximately 30% saturated fat, 33% poly-unsaturated fat (containing Essential Fatty Acids) and 37% mono-unsaturated fat. Below is a chart showing the smoke point and the balance of fat in commonly used oils.
Oil Type
Smoke Point
Mono-unsaturated Fat
Poly-unsaturated Fat
Saturated Fat
Rice Bran Oil
254˚C
47%
33%
20%
Olive Oil
182˚C
77%
9%
14%
Canola Oil
232˚C
61%
33%
7%
Peanut Oil
237˚C
48%
34%
18%
Soybean Oil
226˚C
24%
61%
15%
Grape Seed Oil
251˚C
14%
77%
9%
Olive Oil

High mono fat, able to lower cholesterol but deficient in poly fat, which contains Essential Fatty Acids (EFA).

EFA’s are truly essential to life as every metabolic process in your body depends on them.  A low smoke point makes it a poor choice for frying, and its heavy taste bakes it undesirable in many baked goods.  Traditionally a good salad oil.

Canola Oil

High mono fat with cholesterol lowering ability but there are concerns about the origin.  “Canola Oil” is a term coined by Canada to change the name of “rapeseed oil”.  The Rapeseed plant contains erucic acid making it toxic and is used as an industrial lubricant.  It has been generically modified and hybrid to produce a low erucic acid version.  Commonly hydrogenated, it is extensively used in the food industry because of low price.  The hybrid plant would be the best choice.

Peanut Oil

A good balanced oil.  This oil has good cholesterol lowering ability and a high smoke point, making it a good frying oil.  It imparts a slightly earthy, nutty flavour.  It lacks the anti-oxidants and micronutrients of Rice Bran Oil.  A small percentage of people are allergic to nut oils.

Soybean Oil

This oil is high poly fat.  As recommended by the AHA your poly fat intake should be around 33% of your total fat intake.  A high poly percentage is an aid to tumors and cancer and should be carefully watched.  Up to 80% of the oil consumed in the USA today comes from soybeans.  Soybean oil is commonly hydrogenated and used in many processed foods.

Grape Seed Oil

A good frying and salad oil, but again high in poly fat, it does lower cholesterol because of the high unsaturated fat content but is way over the recommended 33% poly-unsaturated fat.

Rice Bran Oil

The most balanced and versatile oil on the market and closest to the AHA recommendations.  Rice Bran Oil is a superior salad, cooking and frying oil which leaves no lingering after taste.  The high smoke point prevents fatty acid breakdown at high temperatures.  Its light viscosity allows less oil to be absorbed in cooking, reducing overall calories.  It mixes better in salad dressings and improves the taste of baked goods, providing cholesterol reduction, nutritional and anti-oxidant value. 

Rice Bran Oil Spread 

Rice Bran Oil Spread is enriched with natural plant sterols. It is ideal as part of a varied and balanced diet and in conjunction with a healthy lifestyle. Rice Bran Oil Steads can assist in lowering cholesterol absorption. 

Rice Bran Oil Shortening

Rice Bran Shortening is a premium multipurpose cooking oil that has been produced from specially selected rice and carefully refined to maintain the inherent natural anti-oxidants of gamma oryzanol, phytosterols and vitamin E.

Bestfield Pty Ltd

Head office:
Address:  19 Aylward Avenue, Thomastown, Victoria 3074 Australia
Postal Address: PO Box 3076, Ivanhoe North, Victoria 3079 Australia
Email: info@bestfield.com.au
Ph: +61 3 9499 4704
Fax: +61 3 9499 4704
Mobile: 0408 570 490